Presentation at its best!

Martin Harvey – Handwriting

All staff across Rockingham have been working alongside Martin Harvey a consultant for Handwriting and Art to develop the children’s pride and love of writing. We have an agreed policy and scheme that we would like to share with parents, this will enable you to support your child at home. We have a consistant approach to handwriting and love to showcase the children’s learning through our displays.

Our next steps at Rockingham –

NEXT STEPS

Consistency is a key word.

Consistency in terms of the handwriting style and letter shapes being taught

Consistency in terms of how handwriting lessons are taught

Consistency in terms of the way teaching materials and writing tools are used

Consistency in terms of the teaching language which is used

We plan to ‘Do a little and do it often’ is a key phrase. Doing a little means lessons of 15/20 minutes. Doing it often means doing at least four handwriting lessons per week

These are some of the strategies we will be teaching the children –

ESSENTIAL HABITS FOR DEVELOPING EXCELLENT HANDWRITING

  1. Two hands. Insist on children always using two hands when writing. One hand to hold the paper and one hand to write with.
  1. Six feet. Children must always keep six feet on the floor. Their own two

          feet and the chair’s four feet. This means that the child does not kneel

or sit cross legged on the chair. Neither do they rock backwards or

forwards on the chair.

  1. Ensure that children always sit in the BBC position – Bottom

          Back in Chair. This means that they never sit with the chair sticking out

and their bottom on the front edge of the chair.

  1. TNT Tummy Near Table. This ensures that the child is sitting with their

body close to their work, instead of having to stretch forward to write.

  1. Paper position. The paper should be upright when the child is writing or at an

          angle not greater than 45 degrees. When children turn their paper to an angle

greater than this, it is often because the pencil is being held with the thumb in a

position which blocks the child’s view of the pencil point.

We can’t wait to share our progress with you, thank you Martin. I know the children really enjoyed working with you.

 

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Post Author: Rockingham